Executive Functioning: A Developmental Perspective Part 1 (FWS 2020)

 

This 2-part seminar presented information on conceptual and clinical aspects of executive functioning and describe the neurobiological underpinnings from a developmental perspective. In part-1 distinctions of “hot” and “cold” executive functioning were presented and the relationship to self-representation and social-emotional development. Part-2 focused on clinical aspects including the importance of play in the development of executive functioning. Interdisciplinary concepts of play and play-based interventions were presented, including dyadic interventions with very young children and caregivers and Interventions to improve executive functioning in school-age children.

Speakers: Dr. Paula Ray, PsyD,  Psychologist, Private Practice;  Catherine Crowley, OTD, OTR/L, Director of the Minor in Occupational Science Program and Assistant Professor of Clinical Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California     

Dr. Paula Ray is a psychologist with specialization in Pediatric Neuropsychology and Infant/Early Childhood mental health. Areas of special interest include the developmental impact of prenatal exposure to toxins, trauma and environmental stress and traumatic brain injury. Dr. Ray completed training in advanced child assessment at Reiss Davis Child Study Center and Infant Mental Health training with the Early Childhood Foundation at Cedar-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Ray is a Brain Injury Specialist and worked as a Pediatric Neuropsychologist at Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital for a decade after moving to Nebraska. Dr. Ray currently provides statewide training in Child-Parent Psychotherapy and maintains a private practice in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Catherine Crowley has been an occupational therapist since 1974. She began her career working with adults in a psychiatric hospital on the East Coast and thereafter moved west to Colorado to work in the community mental health system. When the facility was closed in light of shifting governmental fiscal priorities and the de-institutionalization movement, Dr. Crowley pursued a master’s degree in Occupational Therapy at the University of Illinois at Chicago, changing her focus of study and practice to pediatrics. Her thesis work involved examining variables in parental involvement in their child’s early intervention programs. In the 1990s, she came to the University of Southern California Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy. She completed her clinical doctorate in 2006 and is the director of the Occupational Science Minor program.

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